YouthBridge Community Foundation – February 2016 Newsletter

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YouthBridge to Launch Think Big for Kids, a Grant that Supports Bold Moves

By Michael Howard, CEO
YouthBridge is launching a new grant program, Think Big for Kids, to stimulate innovative thinking and fund big ideas from nonprofits that serve children and youth in our community. We’re looking for big, ambitious, transformative thinking – ideas that may even be unproven or risky. This is a true opportunity to think outside the box!

Our board has committed $50,000 in seed funding, and we have a generous donor who is offering a 50% matching gift on the first $100,000 we raise. We’re working toward having a grant pool of at least $200,000.

YouthBridge will begin accepting online letters of intent starting April 4, 2016. We will be publishing the guidelines on our website soon, and we’re planning a launch event mid-April for nonprofits and donors interested in learning more.

Please visit YouthBridge.org for more information and updates on Think Big for Kids.

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c292d643-36aa-421c-a82b-bb1f31a52338Brackets for Good is Coming and $10,000 is Up for Grabs!

This March, 64 local nonprofits will compete in the first ever bracket-style fundraising tournament in St. Louis. The six-round tournament takes place over five weeks beginning on February 26 and ending on April 1, with each of the first four rounds lasting a full week and the semifinal and championship round each lasting three days.

This online tournament will allow nonprofits to use their best fundraising strategies in a nail-biting online competition. YouthBridge Community Foundation is sponsoring the 2016 Brackets for Good tournament and providing a $10,000 prize to the winner. Local nonprofits will keep any funds they raise in the competition, and the champion of the tournament walks away with $10,000!

Go to stlouis.bfg.org to learn more and donate. You can help your favorite nonprofit get to the championship and win $10,000! As they say, “It’s competitive giving. Everybody wins!”

715c56c4-7f5e-4131-9aa5-69f2e2b9ce53Ready by 21 St. Louis!

Ready by 21 St. Louis envisions organizations, companies and individuals working across youth-serving systems to align policy, practice and investment to support youth readiness for school, work and life. Ready by 21 St. Louis is the region’s strategy to Master Plan services and supports for children in order to change the trajectory of a generation.

YouthBridge is a supporter of the mission and goals of this community effort. Mike Howard, CEO of YouthBridge, serves on the Leadership Council for Ready by 21 St. Louis. Mike stated, “The proven results from similar work in other communities around the country are impressive. Working collaboratively, across multiple sectors to create systemic change is not easy and sometimes messy, but our children deserve it and our community needs it.”

Ready by 21 St. Louis will soon publish an update on its progress towards a Master Plan for improving child well-being.

To get involved or learn more, please visit ReadyBy21stl.org.

2af9dc66-78f5-490d-a88d-838e9be24d7bMaking Sense of the Many Kinds of Impact Investing

By Brian Trelstad
Harvard Business Review
Everyone agrees that impact investing is on the rise. According to the Global Impact Investing Network, the market for impact capital, currently sized at $60 billion, could grow over the next decade to $2 trillion, or 1% of global invested assets. But despite this growing interest, impact investing still faces a significant stumbling block that limits the flow of new capital into the field: not everyone agrees on what “impact investing” actually means.

Currently, impact can mean anything from venture investments in new health technologies to microfinance loans in Peru; from affordable housing in the US to renewable energy in India; from social impact bonds to private equity funds that create jobs. That’s just the beginning of the confusion—even if you accepted that such diverse investments should all be grouped into one category, how do you even measure and compare impact anyway? READ MORE